FAQ-General Questions


What purpose does a funeral serve?
What do funeral directors do?
Why have a public viewing?
Why should I Go?
What is the purpose of embalming?
Does the deceased have to be embalmed, according to law?
Isn't burial space becoming scarce?
What are vaults and graveliners?
Are vaults always required for Earth burial?
Must I be a church member in order for a Mass of Christian Burial?
Can you conduct services nearer to my home?
What if I die away from home?
Is cremation a substitute for a funeral?
Is cremation as a means of disposition increasing?
Can I have a viewing if I select cremation?
What can be done with the remains if a cremation is chosen?
Do you have rental caskets available for viewings before a cremation?
What is pre-arranging?
How do I write a eulogy?



What purpose does a funeral serve?
Whether referred to as a funeral, memorial or celebration of life, this process is a time to pay tribute, reflect on memories, gain strength from others, and begin to accept one of life’s many changes. It enables family and friends to gather and express their feelings and begin the healing process


What do funeral directors do?

• Funeral directors are caregivers and administrators. They make the arrangements for transportation of the deceased, complete all necessary paperwork, and implement the choices made by the family regarding the funeral and final disposition of the deceased.

• Funeral directors are listeners, advisors and supporters. They have experience assisting the bereaved in coping with death. Funeral directors are trained to answer questions about grief, recognize when a person is having difficulty coping, and recommend sources of professional help. Funeral directors also link survivors with support groups in the community.


Why have a public viewing?

Viewing is part of many cultural and ethnic traditions. Many grief specialists believe that viewing aids in the grief process by helping the bereaved to recognize the reality of death. Viewing is encouraged for children, as long as the process is explained and the activity voluntary.

Viewing the deceased is a way of honoring the transition from life to death and saying our last farewells. Embalming is a familiar and standard part of funerals in North America today, though it is optional. Embalming the deceased temporarily preserves it so family and friends can say farewell.


Why should I Go?

When you attend the tribute of a family member or friend you will be contributing to a fellowship and network-of-support that is of immeasurable value. It is a gesture of caring that you want to acknowledge the life that was lived. By going to the service, you will be a part of the patchwork that makes the service a memorable one.


What is the purpose of embalming?

Except in certain special cases, embalming is not required by law. Embalming may be necessary, however, if you select certain funeral arrangements, such as a funeral with a viewing. If you do not want embalming, you usually have the right to choose an arrangement that does not require you to pay for it, such as direct cremation or immediate burial. 
No human remains may remain unburied or uncremated in New Jersey for more than 48 hours unless embalmed or refrigerated. (N.J.A.C. 8:9-1.1)

Embalming makes it possible to lengthen the time between death and the final disposition, thus allowing family members time to arrange and participate in the type of service most comforting to them.


Does the deceased have to be embalmed, according to law?

No. Most states, however, require embalming when:
• Death was caused by a reportable contagious disease
• Remains are to be transported from one state to another by common carrier
• If final disposition is not to be made within a prescribed number of hours


Isn't burial space becoming scarce?

While it is true some metropolitan areas have limited available cemetery space, in most areas of the country, there is enough space set aside for the next 50 years without creating new cemeteries. In addition, land available for new cemeteries is more than adequate, especially with the increase in entombment and multi-level grave burial.


What are vaults and graveliners?

Vaults are lined and sealed concrete outer burial containers which prevent the grave from caving in due to the weight of the earth and cemetery equipment. They are designed to protect the casket by reducing the risk of intrusion of exterior elements. Concrete graveliners are outer burial containers designed to withstand the weight of the earth to prevent the grave from collapsing. This gives the minimal protection and is not lined or sealed. We have a variety of outer burial containers for you to choose from. Our funeral directors can explain any further questions you may have.


Are vaults always required for Earth burial?

No. Each cemetery determines its own vault requirements. Some cemeteries do require vaults while others do not. Our funeral directors will inform you about whether or not a vault purchase is needed for the particular cemetery chosen.


Must I be a church member in order for a Mass of Christian Burial?

You do not need to be a member of a church in order for a Mass of Christian Burial to be celebrated.


Can you conduct services nearer to my home?

Absolutely, through an association with other family owned and independent funeral homes you can have visitations, services, and memorial services at other funeral homes, churches, community centers, and/or other facilities of choice conveniently located to you upon request. Unlike cremation or memorial societies and other alternative funeral operations who offer limited service, Pable-Evertz Funeral Home is a full service funeral and cremation service, able to meet every need of families we serve.


What if I die away from home?

If a death should occur away from home, we can help your family make the necessary arrangements. It's best to contact us first so we can understand your wishes about what needs to be done. Then we can coordinate everything for you. In most cases, we can make all the arrangements here for bringing someone home from a distant location for a local funeral. For further information, please contact our office.


Is cremation a substitute for a funeral?

No, cremation is an alternative to earth burial or entombment for the deceased's final disposition and often follows a traditional funeral service.


Is cremation as a means of disposition increasing?

Yes, but not dramatically.


Can I have a viewing if I select cremation?

Absolutely. You can have a full traditional service, with viewing, and a funeral service at the funeral home or church. The cremation will then take place the following day. The cremains can be kept by the family or interred in your cemetery plot.


What can be done with the remains if a cremation is chosen?
Cremated remains can be put in an urn and kept at home, they can be buried in a cemetery, they can be placed in a niche in a cemetery, or they can be scattered at sea. We have a large variety of urns on display at the funeral home for you to choose from.


Do you have rental caskets available for viewings before a cremation?
Yes. We have two caskets specifically for this purpose.


What is pre-arranging?
Pre-arranging is a way of making informed decisions ahead of time instead of hasty, emotional choices often made at the time of need. Your true wishes about your funeral can be expressed and made with your family and friends. Pre-arranging your funeral also spares your family stressful decisions at a difficult time by eliminating doubt about what you wanted for your funeral. There are also a wide variety of funding options including life insurance, designed to make pre-payment simple and easy.


How do I write a eulogy?
These questions should get you thinking:

• How did you and the deceased become close? 
• Is there a humorous or touching event that represents the essence of your passed loved one? 
• What did you and others love and admire about the deceased? 
• What will you miss most about him or her? Some of the simplest thoughts are deeply touching and easy for those congregated to identify with. For example, "I'll miss her smile," or "I'll never forget the way he laughed," are just as good as "I admired her selflessness."


Tips:

• Be honest and focus on the person's positive qualities. 
• Humor is acceptable if it fits the personality of the deceased. 
• "If you are inclined to be a perfectionist, lower your expectations and just do what you can given the short time-frame and your emotional state," writes Schaeffer in Labor of Love. 
• Keep it brief. Five to ten minutes is the norm, but it's a good idea to verify that with the minister or funeral director. 
• Interviewing family and friends will give you more ideas.
• Put the eulogy on paper - at least in outline form.